Playable City Tokyo Residency 2018

The Playable City Tokyo Residency is an opportunity to collaboratively research and develop playful ideas at the intersection of art, technology, society that innovate around public space in Tokyo. We are looking for two creative, ambitious people from any discipline who believe we can start a new kind of city conversation through play.

Building on the work of an ongoing Playable City Tokyo programme, the Playable City Tokyo Residency supports, inspires and challenges participants to develop playful interventions using creative technology to respond to public space in and around central Tokyo.

The Playable City Tokyo Residency has been awarded to Sophie Sampson and Thomas Metcalfe. Read more about the announcement. The first half of the residency took part in June. Both Tom and Sophie wrote about their experience in Tokyo for the British Council in Japan.

The second half of the residency will take place in Tokyo in September and will involve public play testing and a presentation at the Making the City Playable 2018 on September 28.

The Playable City Residency 2018 is produced by Watershed in collaboration with the British Council, with special cooperation from Rhizomatiks and JKD Collective Inc.

Successful Applicants were awarded:

  • £3,750 GBP Honorarium for the programme
  • UK-Tokyo economy-class return flights, accommodation and per diems for the duration of both visits to Japan
  • Support from Playable City Producer and Creative Technologist for delivery of prototypes
  • Access to the International Playable City Network including the 15 members of Creative Producers International, Watershed’s global talent development programme designed to support the city change makers of the future
  • Professional documentation of the work

If you have any questions or queries please contact: playablecity@watershed.co.uk

The Playable City Tokyo Residency 2018 is a Tokyo Tokyo Festival Grant Program and is supported by Arts Council Tokyo, Tokyo Metropolitan Foundation for History and Culture.

Image: Kenichi Aikawa for British Council Japan

 

 

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